The GDELT Project introduced in a previous post discussed the origins and high-level information included in the project’s datasets.  This post will specifically explore the version 2.0 features of the Mentions dataset, which records where GDELT Events are initially discovered or later referenced, and statistics surrounding the mentions of the event in question.

Continue Reading "A quick look at the GDELT Mentions schema"

The GDELT Project introduced in a previous post discussed the origins and high-level information included in the project’s datasets.  This post will specifically explore the version 2.0 features of the Event dataset, which is the core data that everything else is keyed off.

Continue Reading "Digging into the GDELT Event schema"

The Global Database of Events, Language and Tone (GDELT) Project is a massive and extensive database of global events and related media mentions, as well as extracted/inferred information, going back to 1979.  It provides a rich set of data that can be explored for macroeconomics, humanitarian relief, geopolitical movements, and so much more.

Continue Reading "Exploring the GDELT Project"

Quite possibly one of the most-quoted phrases in the software industry:

“If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.”

— Abraham Maslow, The Psychology of Science (1966)

This is often pulled out and dusted off when discussions of high-level architectural components, stacks, and programming languages begin to get a bit heated.  This post was inspired by a discussion with a budding computer scientist I know regarding why there are so many different programming languages, tools, and environments.

Continue Reading "The hammer and the nail"

As a Georgia Tech OMSCS student as well as working software professional, advanced security topics are always something I want to learn more about. Georgia Tech’s Institute for Information Security & Privacy is presenting a weekly Cybersecurity Lecture Series on Fridays this fall, and being a local I’ve started attending them. Here are my quick (albeit not necessarily complete) notes from this week’s presentation by Tudor Dumitraș, Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland.

Continue Reading "Notes from GT-IISP’s Cyber Security Lecture Series: Automatic Feature Engineering: Learning to Detect Malware by Mining the Scientific Literature"

As a Georgia Tech OMSCS student as well as working software professional, advanced security topics are always something I want to learn more about. Georgia Tech’s Institute for Information Security & Privacy is presenting a weekly Cybersecurity Lecture Series on Fridays this fall, and being a local I’ve started attending them. Here are my quick (albeit not necessarily complete) notes from this week’s presentation by Joel Odom of CipherLab @ GTRI.

Continue Reading "Notes from GT-IISP’s Cyber Security Lecture Series: Software Assurance & Exploitation"

As a Georgia Tech OMSCS student as well as working software professional, advanced security topics are always something I want to learn more about. Georgia Tech’s Institute for Information Security & Privacy is presenting a weekly Cybersecurity Lecture Series on Fridays this fall, and being a local I’ve started attending them. Here are my quick (albeit not necessarily complete) notes from this week’s presentation by Yeongjin Jang, a PhD student at Georgia Tech.

Continue Reading "Notes from “Breaking Kernel Address Space Layout Randomization (KASLR) with Intel TSX”"

As a Georgia Tech OMSCS student as well as working software professional, advanced security topics are always something I want to learn more about. Georgia Tech’s Institute for Information Security & Privacy is presenting a weekly Cybersecurity Lecture Series on Fridays this fall, and being a local I’ve started attending them. Here are my quick (albeit not necessarily complete) notes from this week’s presentation.

Continue Reading "Notes from “The Myths of Computer Security”"